Book Review

Book Review: The Call of the Citadel by Vikram Singh Deol and Parneet Jaggi

Title: The Call of the CitadelFront Cover -The Call of the Citadel

Author: Vikram Singh Deol and Parneet Jaggi

Publisher: Authors Press

Genre: Historical Fiction

First Publication: 2020

Language: English

Major Characters: Peter Das, Devika, Kalika Das, Indro

Theme: “Simplification of an enigma” is the key statement.  Through a pictorial and narrative description of the Indus Valley Civilization – its culture and its amalgamation with other cultures, the novel simplifies and fictionalizes history, trying to comprehend what might have happened around 2000-3000 years ago with our ancestors in the Indian subcontinent.

Setting: A city called Mohan-toh-Daro (modelled on Mohenjodaro of Indus Valley Civilization)

Narrator: Third person

 

Book Summary: The Call of the Citadel by Vikram Singh Deol and Parneet Jaggi

When two distinct human races develop in secluded and protected environments, they evolve according to their needs and resources. However, over time, when resources deplete with the increase in population, they adapt by searching for new lands and technologies.

Based in the Indian sub-continent, the story begins when the people of Mohan-toh-Daro investigate the brutal murders on the banks of river Indu. This investigation leads to the shocking and unanticipated event of coming in contact with another disparate race, which they identify as gods rather than invaders.

The new clans discern the people of Mohan-toh-Daro with awe for their technological advancement, and on the other side, the people of Mohan-toh-Daro are amazed at the remarkable hunting skills and the weapons of the arrivers. Circumstances lead to an imminent battle between the two races. What happens when two differently equipped races encounter each other? What repercussions do they carry through the ages that directly affect us as denizens of this world?

Indus Valley Civilization is an enigmatic phase of our history that has mostly generated debates and arguments than facts and convincing theories. There has been an amalgamation of races and civilizations in India from time to time and the present day Indian reader is unable to relate to his own civilization owing to obscurity.

 

Book Review: The Call of the Citadel by Vikram Singh Deol and Parneet Jaggi

As you may have guessed from blurb, The Call of the Citadel centers upon the clashes between two different races in the Indus Valley civilisation. The story opens with gruesome murders on the bank of river Indu. While investigating these murders, people of Mohan-toh-Daro found about another distinct race, Indro’s Clan. This new race arrived there to expand their reign and settle there comfortably. The clash between two races turned into a fierce battle in which Mohan-toh-Daro loses and falls into the hands of invader Indro’s clan. What are the consequences of this war and how it affects the Indus Valley civilisation?

Ironically, wars also bring into focus how amazing and inspiring humanity can be.The Call of the Citadel counters the fear and terror of war with perseverance, strength, and flaming resilience. The philosophical content in this book is simply jaw-dropping.

Mind has its own eyes. The beauty seen inside is the beauty that transcends expression.

The prose was evocative and powerful, capable of igniting a variety of emotions. Both authors have done a wonderful job with words. They also truly dived into the philosophy and psychology of the people of Indus Valley civilisation extremely well. Every word—even when they were information dumping—is imbued with a savage gravitational pull that utterly gripping. Every scene was important in order to reach the culmination found in the final sections of the book, which was awe-inspiring.

Authors’ portrayal of the battle captured the power and strength of the ancient civilisation. Told in vivid details that seems to transport all your senses into the book, you’ll feel the battle, tragedy, doom, and hope unfolding right in front of your eyes. You won’t be able to stop reading about the savage nature of humanity as it inflicts devastation and the counter method employed by the people of Mohan-toh-Daro.

Life and death are here to stay. If one is here, the other is not far away.

Beneath the gores and battle, the nature of this book was hopeful and inspiring. There were myriads of incredibly positive messages in this book. There are many reasons why I recommend The Call of the Citadel. Here are a few of them:

  • The writing carries with it the essence of past days.
  • The Call of the Citadel is incredibly researched. It is not only a great story being retold in an imaginative way, but the entire ancient culture is on display.
  • It is a mixture between a book on history and an interesting novel and It is easy to get wrapped up in the story.
  • The characters stay true to who they are, and the main ones are fleshed out, showing their weaknesses as well as their strengths.
  • Even though you can predict this story and how it ends, the tension builds from early on and the last quarter of the book is a page-turner.

Anyone who loves to read history, historical fiction, or a well-written book of any genre will like The Call of the Citadel.


 

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