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Book Review: Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind by Yuval Noah Harari

Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind is a book by Yuval Noah Harari first published in Hebrew in Israel in 2011, and in English in 2014. The book surveys the history of humankind from the evolution of archaic human species in the Stone Age up to the twenty-first century, focusing on Homo sapiens.

Book Review: Defining Your Greatness by Lorraine V Cuff

The greatness begins with a state of mind, with definiteness of purpose and with little or no hard work. We should have faith within ourselves, our ideas and work. Faith is basically a state of mind which may be induced or created by affirmation or repeated instructions to the subconscious mind through the principle of auto-suggestion.

An Anti-Racist Reading List: Highly Rated Non-fiction Books by Black Authors

Our present moment serves not only as a call to action, but a chance to teach ourselves and our society about the underlying issues that led to the unnecessary murder of George Floyd. The booklist below includes a combination of titles that educate about racism, antiracism, white fragility, and more. In that vein, we've gathered antiracist nonfiction books, memoirs, and histories on the subject of race, written by black authors. While by no means a comprehensive list, these books are a decent place to begin.

Book Review: Arya Dharma : The Noble Dharma by Bollachettira Dhyan Appachu

This book, 'Arya Dharma', is a work of very high quality and very deep research for which the author learned nearly all the ancient Indian cultures and all of its ancient literature. The work is polymathic in it's outlook and covers nearly all known aspects of the Indian civilization from its geography, its literature, governance, religion, philosophy to science and even coinage.

Book Review- Born a Crime: Stories From a South African Childhood by Trevor Noah

Born a Crime by Trevor Noah is remarkably wonderful memoir I've read. Not just because of the content--which is at times heartbreaking and mindblowing--but also because of the humor and warmth with which Trevor Noah’s managed to convey some very difficult life experiences.

Book Review: Shrill: Notes from a Loud Woman by Lindy West

Shrill by Lindy West is put together as a blend of memoir and opinion, as Lindy West recounts how she's spent her life being scorned for her weight/size, but nevertheless got over any shyness about public speaking, got involved with stand-up comedy, and developed a thick-enough skin to tolerate the absolutely appalling trolling she receives in her current job as an opinion columnist.

Book Review: The Good, The Bad and the Unknown by Raj Tilak Roushan

Each story in The Good, the Bad and the Unknown is just a small, non-significant mystery that Rishi has to solve, some of which could be featured as side-plots in a fully-formed novel. With these stories you gain an insight in to author Raj Tilak Roushan himself, the people he works with and against.

Book Review: How much is too much?: Divorce in India by Neha Mehrotra

'How much is too much?: Divorce in India' is a part relationship self-help book, part memoir of the author Neha Mehrotra. Most of the book is an examination of the history of marriage and the recent changes in marriage, the repercussions of which we're still working through.

Book Review: Becoming by Michelle Obama

Becoming by Michelle Obama is one of the most powerful memoirs ever written. It is not an inspirational one nor a controversial one not even a political book of secrets - the book's strength lies in it's simple candid ring side view of a stellar life of a woman of great importance.

Book Review: Maybe You Should Talk to Someone by Lori Gottlieb

Maybe You Should Talk to Someone by Lori Gottlieb is a fascinating look into the world of a therapist and how therapy works. Sprinkled throughout the book are snippets of psychology, including explanations of defence mechanisms, stages of change, tasks of mourning, and brief glimpses of the contributions of Freud, Erikson, Rogers, Franklin, and others to the field of psychology.

Book Review: Bossypants by Tina Fey

Bossypants by Tina Fey is a collection of essays about different experiences Ms. Fey has had, such as being a working mom and making a career in the predominantly male field of sketch comedy.

Book Review: Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer

Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer is a non-fiction account of the life of Christopher McCandless, a young man who, upon graduating from college in 1990, gave away all his money and took up a life of wandering the country, mostly in the western and southwestern states.

Most Read

Book Review: A Silent Takeover by Sarvananda Chandrashekaraiah

A Silent Takeover was intense and suspenseful, and was a thriller to its very core. This book flows so smoothly, at a nice brisk pace. It’s one that you could easily read in a day or two if you were so inclined. There is an intriguing plot, lots of twists, some wonderful characters, plenty of clues, suspects, and a good dose of thrill.

Book Review: Finding Your Seat at the Table by Teboho Mofokeng

Finding Your Seat at the Table by Teboho Mofokeng is a tremendously valuable book for anyone who is looking not for a job, but a career that offers control, autonomy, and gives you a sense of fulfillment. The subtitle of this book reveals the main theme of the book: “Creating the Ideal Career”. This book will give you the step by step plan to achieve it.

Book Review: The Martian by Andy Weir

The Martian by Andy Weir is a hard science fiction novel about one man being stranded on Mars and trying not to die. It features such riveting activities as growing potatoes using your own faeces as part of the soil and repair work on multiple pieces of equipment. Mark Watney was part of a six-person crew that constituted the third manned expedition to Mars. The mission was to remain on the Red Planet for thirty-one days, but six days into their stay, a huge dust storm blew up with ferocious winds that forced the crew to abandon the mission.

Book Review: The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows

The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society was a really clever gradual unfolding of friendship and the suffering undergone by the captive population of Guernsey during the occupation of the Third Reich during the early 1940's.