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Book Review: Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe

Things Fall Apart tells two concurrent stories that overlap and counterbalance each other throughout the novel. One of the novel's focuses centers around the protagonist Okonkwo, a fierce warrior who represents traditional African culture. The other focus is on Okonkwo's tribe, Umuofia, as it undergoes a drastic change in all areas of life once European missionaries enter the fray.

Book Review: One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez

One Hundred Years of Solitude is considered by many as Marquez’s masterpiece and that alone says a lot- after all the man won a Nobel Prize. The novel tells the story of Macondo, a fictional town in Latin America, through the history of the Buendia family. The Buendias, generation after generation witnessed the rise, the glory and the fall of the mythical town they called home.

Book Review: The Call of the Citadel by Vikram Singh Deol and Parneet Jaggi

As you may have guessed from blurb, The Call of the Citadel centers upon the clashes between two different races in the Indus Valley civilisation. The story opens with gruesome murders on the bank of river Indu.

Book Review: The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah

The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah is a historical fiction, set in German-occupied France during WWII. Spanning the years of the war, this riveting story follows two sisters, Vianne and Isabelle, as they struggle to survive and persevere through the Nazi invasion.

Book Review: First Among Equals by Jeffrey Archer

Although First Among Equals is about politics, Jeffrey Archer weaves through the book the personal stories of each of the men. This worked effectively and by the end of the book I was surprised to feel a strong connection to each of the characters.

Book Review: Origin by Dan Brown (Robert Langdon Series #5)

At the heart of Origin by Dan Brown there are two questions: Where do we come from ? Where are we going? Both equally fascinating but also very much controversial. I'm someone who loves controversial topics. Critical thinking. Stepping outside the box. It fascinates me. And Origin by Dan Brown had all of the above. I totally agree with the author. 

Book Review: Daisy Jones and The Six by Taylor Jenkins Reid

Daisy Jones and The Six by Taylor Jenkins Reid is about a band from the seventies who had a fleeting moment of intense fame, but ironically exploded apart in orgasmic demise. Their music was of such a superb quality that it resonated throughout the decades, despite the band's short duration.

Dan Brown Books | List of the books by Dan Brown with Summary

One of the greatest aspects of Dan Brown books are the historical elements. There are times that it feels like you're watching a documentary, but an exciting one at that! Sometimes it feels like all those information are too much, but after you are done with the book you will still find yourself wanting to learn more about them.

Book Review: Inferno by Dan Brown (Robert Langdon Series #4)

In Inferno, Dan Brown takes us on his version of Dante's Inferno, the first of three poems in The Divine Comedy. The argument is you have to go through hell before you get to heaven. In Brown's work, the "hell" humanity has to go through is another plague to knock out a chunk of the population, while heaven or paradise would be a world without depleting resources.

Book Review: People of the Book by Geraldine Brooks

People of the Book by Geraldine Brooks is a wonderful story of a magical book, an illuminated manuscript begun in the 15th century and found in Sarajevo after the Bosnian War, a Jewish manuscript rescued by a Muslim librarian who could not bear to see such a treasure be destroyed.

Book Review: The Lost Symbol by Dan Brown (Robert Langdon Series #3)

The Lost Symbol is the third book in the Robert Langdon series, and I was glad to see that Brown brought this dynamic and entertaining character back to the United States from Europe and the UK in his previous books.

Book Review: Beloved by Toni Morrison

Title: Beloved Author: Toni Morrison Publisher: Alfred A. Knopf Genre: Historical Fiction, Magical Realism First Publication: 1987 Language: English Major Characters: Baby Suggs, Sethe, Beloved, Paul D Garner, Denver Setting Place: The outskirts of Cincinnati, Ohio...

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A Silent Takeover was intense and suspenseful, and was a thriller to its very core. This book flows so smoothly, at a nice brisk pace. It’s one that you could easily read in a day or two if you were so inclined. There is an intriguing plot, lots of twists, some wonderful characters, plenty of clues, suspects, and a good dose of thrill.

Book Review: Finding Your Seat at the Table by Teboho Mofokeng

Finding Your Seat at the Table by Teboho Mofokeng is a tremendously valuable book for anyone who is looking not for a job, but a career that offers control, autonomy, and gives you a sense of fulfillment. The subtitle of this book reveals the main theme of the book: “Creating the Ideal Career”. This book will give you the step by step plan to achieve it.

Book Review: The Martian by Andy Weir

The Martian by Andy Weir is a hard science fiction novel about one man being stranded on Mars and trying not to die. It features such riveting activities as growing potatoes using your own faeces as part of the soil and repair work on multiple pieces of equipment. Mark Watney was part of a six-person crew that constituted the third manned expedition to Mars. The mission was to remain on the Red Planet for thirty-one days, but six days into their stay, a huge dust storm blew up with ferocious winds that forced the crew to abandon the mission.

Book Review: The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows

The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society was a really clever gradual unfolding of friendship and the suffering undergone by the captive population of Guernsey during the occupation of the Third Reich during the early 1940's.