Historical Fiction

All The Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

All the Light We Cannot See is an up close and personal story of two kids, one a German orphan boy with incredible engineering skills, the other a blind French girl who loves to read and sometimes leaves the safety of her uncle's home where she is cooped up, trying to keep out of the reach of Nazis during world war two.

The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows

The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society was a really clever gradual unfolding of friendship and the suffering undergone by the captive population of Guernsey during the occupation of the Third Reich during the early 1940's.

The Alice Network by Kate Quinn

The Alice Network by Kate Quinn reads as a fascinating piece of historical fiction torn between the events of World War I and post-World War II France. Despite a few criticisms, it's quite a page-turning gem that illuminates the unfortunate German-occupied France time periods with real and historical characters brought to life in a believable fashion. If anyone has read Kristin Hannah's 'The Nightingale,' they will enjoy this book, and vice versa.

Schindler’s List by Thomas Keneally

Thomas Keneally's Schindler's List (or Schindler's Ark) is an account of how the Nazi member and industrialist Oskar Schindler rescued over a thousand Jews from very probable death from at Auschwitz, by protecting them as workers at his enamel ware factory. Thomas Keneally won the Man Booker Prize for Schindler's List in 1982.

Outlander by Diana Gabaldon

Outlander by Diana Gabaldon is not just romance, though romance is a big part of it and it's one of the best things about it. This book is about seeing the gap of generations, seeing how in 200 hundred years so many things have changed, not only epochal, but also people.. People have changed, their ways of mind and heart are completely different and Claire is forced to adapt or die.

The Best Historical Fiction Books that will make you travel through time

Typically, historical fiction books are written about 30–50 years after the event has taken place. The read historical events and the time period of the book play as crucial of a role in the story as any character or plot twist.

Book Review: Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe

Things Fall Apart tells two concurrent stories that overlap and counterbalance each other throughout the novel. One of the novel's focuses centers around the protagonist Okonkwo, a fierce warrior who represents traditional African culture. The other focus is on Okonkwo's tribe, Umuofia, as it undergoes a drastic change in all areas of life once European missionaries enter the fray.

Book Review: One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez

One Hundred Years of Solitude is considered by many as Marquez’s masterpiece and that alone says a lot- after all the man won a Nobel Prize. The novel tells the story of Macondo, a fictional town in Latin America, through the history of the Buendia family. The Buendias, generation after generation witnessed the rise, the glory and the fall of the mythical town they called home.

Book Review: The Call of the Citadel by Vikram Singh Deol and Parneet Jaggi

As you may have guessed from blurb, The Call of the Citadel centers upon the clashes between two different races in the Indus Valley civilisation. The story opens with gruesome murders on the bank of river Indu.

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