Science Fiction

The Martian by Andy Weir

The Martian by Andy Weir is a hard science fiction novel about one man being stranded on Mars and trying not to die. It features such riveting activities as growing potatoes using your own faeces as part of the soil and repair work on multiple pieces of equipment. Mark Watney was part of a six-person crew that constituted the third manned expedition to Mars. The mission was to remain on the Red Planet for thirty-one days, but six days into their stay, a huge dust storm blew up with ferocious winds that forced the crew to abandon the mission.

Book Review: Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell

Nineteen Eighty-Four is an outstandingly (in every sense of the word) powerful, thought-provoking, compelling, engaging portrait of an all too feasible near future. Parallels in history are clearly there to see – the National Socialism of Hitler, the Communism of Stalin to name but two – showing us the absolute feasibility of such a world.

Book Review: Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

Fahrenheit 451 is a dystopian novel by the American writer Ray Bradbury. It was published in 1953 and was considered as one of Bradbury’s best works. It is divided into three major parts: Part1: The Hearth and the Salamander, Part 2: The Sieve and the Sand and Part3: Burning Bright. The novel Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury depicts a futuristic society that suppresses free thought by means of outlawing books and burning them. Firemen are hired in order to set fire to any written material that crosses their path.

Book Review: The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes by Suzanne Collins (The Hunger Games #0)

The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes is really interesting less as a villain origin story and more as a reflection on the early days of The Hunger Games. Coriolanus Snow is 18 during the events of this book, and the tenth Games are about to start. Ten years previous, when he and his classmates were 7 or 8 years old, the rebels attacked the Capitol, killing tons of people, causing mass starvation (some people even resorted to cannibalism), and leaving the city in shambles, both physically and economically.

Book Review: Mockingjay by Suzanne Collins (The Hunger Games #3)

In Mockingjay by Suzanne Collins, final installment of The Hunger Games, the most deadly and costly games are launched as the district rebels and the Capitol fight to the bloody finish for power over Panem. Katniss Everdeen continues to be the pawn, but as the games unravel, it’s never quite clear what side she should be playing for and who she should trust.

Book Review: Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins (The Hunger Games #2)

Catching Fire starts up not far from where The Hunger Games ended. Katniss is living in the Victors Village with her family. You'd think she could finally be able to relax and live the cushy life. Well that wouldn't make a good book. There are rumors of rebellion and since Katniss and Peeta won the Hunger Games in defiance they have become the faces of that rebellion. The Capitol, particularly President Snow, is not happy with them. Now Katniss has to worry about looking as in love with Peeta as possible to quiet down the rebellion, but is that what she really wants?

Book Review: The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins (The Hunger Games #1)

Written along the lines of Stephen King’s The Long Walk or George Orwell’s 1984, The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins still feels very original and sucked me in completely with its modern day Survivor-esque retelling. The Hunger Games is the ultimate in reality TV, suspense, scripted realism, romance and survival that you should not miss.

Book Review: The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger

The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger is one of those stories that pulls you into the characters' lives and leaves you wanting more, mulling over the scenes and premise for days after you've reluctantly turned the last page.

Book Review: Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel

In Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel, author portrays her survivors as yearning to keep the flame of civilization lit. We follow Miranda, the Station Eleven graphic novel artist and the graphic novel that survives the apocalypse.

Recent Articles

Indian Stories: Images and Thoughts by Ravi Valluri

It is an utter delight from beginning to end. A smorgasbord of historical people and places, facts, festivals and parties, pilgrimages and ancient texts. It is also full of touching examples of everyday life - as Ravi Valluri explores with a kindly eye, the nooks and crannies of India and its people.

Teboho Mofokeng

Teboho Mofokeng is a professionally licensed civil engineer with a master’s degree in wastewater treatment. By the age of 30 She was a mother of two and an associate director at that engineering firm which at the time had its headquarters in Australia.

Angela’s Ashes by Frank McCourt

Angela's Ashes by Frank McCourt is a quintessential coming of age story viewed through the grimy, unyielding, and sometimes downright heartbreaking lens of poverty. It follows Frank McCourt as he comically explains the dire circumstances of his conception, birth, and life.

The 8 Stories for Businesses and Professionals by Michael Burns

'The 8 Stories for Businesses and Professionals' by Michael Burns teaches business people how to present their company, their products. and themselves in a way that is memorable and applicable to a variety of audiences.

A Silent Takeover by Sarvananda Chandrashekaraiah

A Silent Takeover was intense and suspenseful, and was a thriller to its very core. This book flows so smoothly, at a nice brisk pace. It’s one that you could easily read in a day or two if you were so inclined. There is an intriguing plot, lots of twists, some wonderful characters, plenty of clues, suspects, and a good dose of thrill.

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